Dr. Patrick Ryan

Weekly Exercises

One-fifth of your course mark is based on your submission of answers to the weekly study questions to OWL, and your prepared participation in class.  Please do not email your study-question answers to me.  

Your answers should be as brief as you can make them.  Treat these like notes to help you remember what the articles are about, and as a means of preparing for discussion. 

Bring your written answer to class, because we will work with them. 

Jan. 16 -  Work

Reading: Gleason & Myers, eds., Chapter 1 (pgs. 17-66)

1. Locate the thesis or main idea (page and line) for each of the essays.
2. As you read these essays, note passages that can help us answer the question: how did household structure, family relationships, and class shape the experience of childhood in the past? 
3.  What, if anything, might we glean from the photograph on page 34 as historical evidence?
4.  Write out two questions of your own about this week's readings. (one for each)


Jan. 23  -  Politics

Reading: Gleason & Myers, eds., Chapter 2 (pgs. 67-103)

1. Locate the thesis or main idea (page and line) for each of the essays.
2. As you read these essays, note passages that show how children and youth expressed themselves politically in the Canadian past - and situations or reasons why that expression might have been suppressed.  
3. Write out two questions of your own about this week's readings. (one for each)


Jan. 30 - Masculinity

Reading: Gleason & Myers, eds., Chapter 3 (pgs. 104-140)

1. Closely examine the 1904 advertisement on page 120, who is it addressed to first and foremost, and what do you think the 'hook' (main selling point) directed toward this audience was?
2. Locate the thesis in Brown's essay this week.
3. Compare the findings in Cook's essay to the discourse of child soldiers offered at www.child-soldier.org/ - note similarities and differences.
4. Write out two questions of your own about this week's readings.  (one for each)


Feb. 6 - Gender

Reading: Gleason & Myers, eds., Chapter 4 (pgs. 141-171)

1. Locate the thesis or main idea (page and line) for each of the essays.
2. In light of Alexander's essay, read the Girl Guide logbook from the 1930s; what passages from it do you find to be historically significant, and why?
3. Take note of the 'male breadwinner ideal' as evidenced in MacDonalds essay; is this ideal gendered in the same way today?  In your view what has changed or remained the same for contemporary young Canadians?
4. Write out two questions of your own about this week's readings. (one for each)


Feb. 13 - Endangered and Dangerous

Reading: Gleason & Myers, eds., Chapter 5 (pgs. 172-209)

1. Locate the thesis or main idea (page and line) for each of the essays.
2. As you read Fahrni's essay on the 1927 fire in Montreal, keep track of evidence of attitudes and practices of children 'at-risk' that strike you as historically significant (e.g. similar or different from the present).  List them with pages and line numbers.
3. According to Myers, how has juvenile delinquency been gender and do you think this has changed since the period of her study?  Briefly explain your view.
4. Write out two questions of your own about this week's readings. (one for each)


Feb. 27 - War

Reading: Gleason & Myers, eds., Chapter 6 (pgs. 210-248)

1. Locate the thesis or main idea (page and line) for each of the essays.
2. Lorenzkowski's essay relies on the memories of individuals, what strengths and weakness do you suspect come with this methodology?
3. Closely examine the Canadian Junior Red Cross document on pages 245-47, and tell what we can learn about the past from this kind of document?
4. Write out two questions of your own about this week's readings. (one for each)


Mar. 6 - Regulation & the Body

Reading: Gleason & Myers, eds., Chapter 7 (pgs. 249-285)

1. Write out two questions of your own about this week's readings. (one for each)
2. Normalcy can be divided into three parts: what's average (a central tendency in a mathematical distribution); what's healthy (functional efficiency); what's acceptable (moral or social correctness).  While reading Gleason, Haynes, or the primary document on page 263, find an example of an historical event or practice or idea for each aspect of normality (or) find examples that cross-over between them; briefly note the passages.
3. Gleason argues that "age" can be used as a category of historical analysis in the social production of inequality much like gender, race, or class.  How is "age" similar to or different from these other ways of tracing the contours of inequity? 
4. Haynes and Gleason both make readers consider difficult ethical questions (inequality, illness, disability, prejudice, tragedy).  Do you find anything problematic in historical research that explores the experiences of children or youths as victims?  Explain your answer.


Mar. 13 - Normality

Reading: Gleason & Myers, eds., Chapter 8 (pgs. 286-326)

1. Locate the thesis or main idea (page and line) for each of the essays.
2. Clarke gives us a view into the authority of experts.  How did families respond to experts, and what does this tell us?
3. Examine the primary document on page 307.  What does the diagram use to delineate the steps and relate age, competency, and class?
4. Write out two questions of your own about this week's readings. (one for each)


Mar. 20 - Residential Schools

Reading: Gleason & Myers, eds., Chapter 9 (pgs. 327-375)

1. Locate the thesis or main idea (page and line) for each of the essays.
2. Read the primary source on pages 368-374.  What do Moses' proposals for improving residential schools aim to accomplish, and what do you think about them?
3. Examine the photographs of the works of art produced by residential schools students on page 347.  The top one is a pillow case cross-stitched in the mid-1930s by girls attending St. Michael's Indian Residential School in Port Alberni.  The lower one shows a beaded class ball made in 1971 by two 12-year-old children attending Kuper Island Residential School and presented to the Lieutenant Governor of BC.  What can we learn from these artifacts; what do they add to our understanding of these children and the schools? 
4. Write out two questions of your own about this week's readings. (one for each)


Mar. 27 -  Citizenship

Reading: Gleason & Myers, eds., Chapter 10 (pgs. 376-409)

1. Locate the thesis or main idea (page and line) for each of the essays.
2. Compare the Unitarian service announcement (pg. 391) with the "Miles for Millions Declaration" (pg. 408).  What is similar; what is different?  Why might this matter?
3. What type of outlook was encouraged by youth citizenship training in Canada after WWII, and in what ways was it limited according the Brookfield and Myers? 
4. Write out two questions of your own about this week's readings. (one for each)


Apr. 3 -  Youth Culture

Reading: Gleason & Myers, eds., Chapter 11 (pgs. 410-457)

1. Locate the thesis or main idea (page and line) for each of the essays.
2. In the Panayotidis and Stortz essay on University visual culture in the E20C, find an example that strikes you as similar to (and another as different from) University life today.  Explain why.
3. What has changed or remained the same in the practices of hitch-hiking since the 1970s, and why? 
4. Write out two questions of your own about this week's readings. (one for each)